U.S. National Archives
U.S. National ArchivesPublic Domain ArchiveNot developed or endorsed by NARA.
  • searchSearch
  • photo_albumStories
  • collectionsCollections
  • infoAbout
  • star_rateUpgrade
Airplanes - Accidents - On October 6, 1919, Lieutenant Chanles B. Austin, A. S., left France Field, canal zone, for Washington, D.C., a flight of 2439 miles, 1350 of which would be over-sea flying. After ten hours battling wind and storm Lieutenant Austin was forced to return to France Field. In spit of the fact that the propeller of Lieut. Austin's machine was made of laminated walnut, the hardest wood known, and further strengthened by being covered with doped fabric, such as used on the wings of airplanes, the propeller did not stand up under the battle with wind and storm

Airplanes - Accidents - On October 6, 1919, Lieutenant Chanles B. Austin, A. S., left France Field, canal zone, for Washington, D.C., a flight of 2439 miles, 1350 of which would be over-sea flying. After ten hours battling wind and storm Lieutenant Austin was forced to return to France Field. In spit of the fact that the propeller of Lieut. Austin's machine was made of laminated walnut, the hardest wood known, and further strengthened by being covered with doped fabric, such as used on the wings of airplanes, the propeller did not stand up under the battle with wind and storm

  • save_altThumbnail200x200
  • save_altSmall640x426
  • save_altMedium1024x682
  • save_altLarge1600x1066
  • save_altOriginal5379x3584

Explorefabric

Exploreair service airplanes

Exploreten hours