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Colin McLachlan, Connecticut

Colin McLachlan, Connecticut

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description

Summary

Original Caption: Illustrated family record (Fraktur) found in Revolutionary War Pension and Bounty-Land-Warrant Application File W25687, for Colin McLachlan, Connecticut., ca. 1800 - ca. 1900..U.S. National Archives’ ARC ID: 300172..Creator: Department of the Interior. Bureau of Pensions. (1849 - 1930)...Subjects:.Fraktur..Persistent URL: research.archives.gov/description/300172 ( http://research.archives.gov/description/300172 ) ..Repository: National Archives at Washington, DC - Textual Reference (RD-DC-1), National Archives Building, 7th and Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Washington, DC, 20408...Access Restrictions: Unrestricted.Use Restrictions: Unrestricted

Frakturs are elaborate illuminated folk art created by the Pennsylvania dutch between 1740 and 1860. They came in a variety of forms including birth, baptismal, marriage, and family certificates. Common artistic motifs in Fraktur include birds, hearts, and tulips, as well as blackletter and italic calligraphy. In the wake of the Civil War, 1775-1783, many widows sought to claim pensions from the government. The frakturs displayed here are those that were sent to the government to prove their relation to the deceased soldier and support the widows' Revolutionary War Pension applications.

date_range

Date

1800
create

Source

The U.S. National Archives
copyright

Copyright info

No known copyright restrictions

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U.S. National Archives

The objects in this collection are from The U.S. National Archives. The U.S. National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) was established in 1934 by President Franklin Roosevelt. NARA keeps those Federal records that are judged to have continuing value—about 2 to 5 percent of those generated in any given year. There are approximately 10 billion pages of textual records; 12 million maps, charts, and architectural and engineering drawings; 25 million still photographs and graphics; 24 million aerial photographs; 300,000 reels of motion picture film; 400,000 video and sound recordings; and 133 terabytes of electronic data. All of these materials are preserved because they are important to the workings of Government, have long-term research worth, or provide information of value to citizens.

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