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Lieutenant Colonel (LCOL) Lee Williams, USAF, Division CHIEF Analysis, Director 0f Personnel, stands guard at the entrance to Wedge One while escorting clean-up crews through the Pentagon. On September 11th, a hijacked airliner struck the Pentagon causing extensive damage to the building. The attack followed similar attacks on the twin towers of the World Trade Center in New York City

Lieutenant Colonel (LCOL) Lee Williams, USAF, Division CHIEF Analysis, Director 0f Personnel, stands guard at the entrance to Wedge One while escorting clean-up crews through the Pentagon. On September 11th, a hijacked airliner struck the Pentagon causing extensive damage to the building. The attack followed similar attacks on the twin towers of the World Trade Center in New York City

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description

Summary

The original finding aid described this photograph as:

Base: Pentagon

State: District Of Columbia (DC)

Country: United States Of America (USA)

Scene Camera Operator: SSGT Larry A. Simmons, USAF

Release Status: Released to Public
Combined Military Service Digital Photographic Files

According to the official 9/11 Commission Report, the Flight 77 was 5 miles (8.0 km) west-southwest of the Pentagon when, it made a 330-degree turn. At the end of the turn, it was descending through 2,200 feet (670 m), pointed toward the Pentagon and downtown Washington. Boeing 757-223, flying at 530 mph over the Navy Annex Building adjacent to Arlington National Cemetery, crashed into the western side of the Pentagon. The plane hit the Pentagon at the first-floor level, and at the moment of impact, the airplane was rolled slightly to the left, with the right wing elevated. The front part of the fuselage disintegrated on impact, while the mid and tail sections moved for another fraction of a second, with tail section debris penetrating furthest into the building. In all, the airplane took eight-tenths of a second to fully penetrate 310 feet (94 m) into the three outermost of the building's five rings and unleashed a fireball that rose 200 feet (61 m) above the building.

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Date

16/09/2001
create

Source

The U.S. National Archives
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Copyright info

No known copyright restrictions

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U.S. National Archives

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