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Photograph of Grant Anderson

Photograph of Grant Anderson

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description

Summary

This item is the prison photograph, also known as the "mug shot," of Leavenworth inmate Grant Anderson, register number 13240. The photograph is divided into two parts. One side captures the inmate's right profile from the middle of the arm to the top of the head. The other side shows a frontal view from the middle of the chest to the top of the head.
Inmate File of Grant Anderson

A mug shot or mugshot is a photographic portrait of a person from the waist up, typically taken after a person is arrested made with a purpose to have a photographic record for identification purposes by victims, the public and investigators. A typical mug shot is two-part, with one side-view, and one front-view. The paired arrangement may have been inspired by the 1865 prison portraits taken by Alexander Gardner of accused conspirators in the Lincoln assassination trial, though Gardner's photographs were full-body portraits with only the heads turned for the profile shots. The earliest mugshot photos of prisoners may have been taken in Belgium in 1843 and 1844. In the UK, the police of London started taking mugshots in 1846. By 1857, the New York City Police Department had a gallery where daguerreotypes of criminals were displayed.

date_range

Date

03/07/1895 - 05/11/1957
create

Source

The U.S. National Archives
copyright

Copyright info

No known copyright restrictions

Exploretwo parts

Explore1900s commoners

Exploregrant anderson

U.S. National Archives

The objects in this collection are from The U.S. National Archives. The U.S. National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) was established in 1934 by President Franklin Roosevelt. NARA keeps those Federal records that are judged to have continuing value—about 2 to 5 percent of those generated in any given year. There are approximately 10 billion pages of textual records; 12 million maps, charts, and architectural and engineering drawings; 25 million still photographs and graphics; 24 million aerial photographs; 300,000 reels of motion picture film; 400,000 video and sound recordings; and 133 terabytes of electronic data. All of these materials are preserved because they are important to the workings of Government, have long-term research worth, or provide information of value to citizens.

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