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EMMAQUA ACCELERATED TEST DSET REAL TIME TEST

EMMAQUA ACCELERATED TEST DSET REAL TIME TEST

Technicians monitor the display and control consoles of the ground-based electro-optical deep space surveillance system. The mount controls and monitors for the two telescopes capable of viewing the sky in real time are visible

REAL TIME PRESSURE SIGNAL CORRELATOR

REAL TIME PRESSURE SIGNAL CORRELATOR

STS053-11-036 - STS-053 - Crewmembers with the HERCULES photographic system

STS053-239-017 - STS-053 - HERCULES photographic system

STS053-239-021 - STS-053 - HERCULES photographic system

STS053-11-024 - STS-053 - HERCULES photographic system

STS053-11-023 - STS-053 - HERCULES photographic system

STS053-239-011 - STS-053 - Crewmembers using the HERCULES photographic system

STS053-239-023 - STS-053 - HERCULES photographic system

STS053-239-009 - STS-053 - Crewmembers using the HERCULES photographic system

STS053-239-015 - STS-053 - HERCULES photographic system

STS053-239-007 - STS-053 - Crewmembers using the HERCULES photographic system

STS053-239-024 - STS-053 - HERCULES photographic system

STS053-239-020 - STS-053 - HERCULES photographic system

STS053-239-016 - STS-053 - HERCULES photographic system

STS053-11-027 - STS-053 - HERCULES photographic system

STS053-11-029 - STS-053 - HERCULES photographic system

STS053-11-033 - STS-053 - Crewmember with the HERCULES photographic system

STS053-11-028 - STS-053 - HERCULES photographic system

STS053-12-021 - STS-053 - Crewmember in the aft FD with the HERCULES Ccamera system

STS053-239-018 - STS-053 - HERCULES photographic system

STS053-239-025 - STS-053 - HERCULES photographic system

STS053-241-037 - STS-053 - Crewmember with HERCULES camera system in the aft FD

STS053-11-022 - STS-053 - HERCULES photographic system

STS053-239-005 - STS-053 - Crewmembers using the HERCULES photographic system

STS053-239-008 - STS-053 - Crewmembers using the HERCULES photographic system

STS053-239-022 - STS-053 - HERCULES photographic system

STS053-11-025 - STS-053 - HERCULES photographic system

STS053-241-035 - STS-053 - Crewmember with HERCULES camera system in the aft FD

STS053-239-019 - STS-053 - HERCULES photographic system

STS053-241-036 - STS-053 - Crewmember with HERCULES camera system in the aft FD

STS053-239-013 - STS-053 - HERCULES photographic system

STS053-239-010 - STS-053 - Crewmembers using the HERCULES photographic system

STS053-11-030 - STS-053 - HERCULES photographic system

STS053-12-020 - STS-053 - Crewmember in the aft FD with the HERCULES camera system.

STS053-239-006 - STS-053 - Crewmember using the HERCULES photographic system

STS053-11-034 - STS-053 - Crewmembers with the HERCULES photographic system

STS053-11-026 - STS-053 - HERCULES photographic system

STS053-239-014 - STS-053 - HERCULES photographic system

STS053-11-032 - STS-053 - Crewmembers with the HERCULES photographic system

STS053-11-035 - STS-053 - Crewmembers with the HERCULES photographic system

STS053-40-031 - STS-053 - Crewmember in the aft flight deck.

STS053-40-030 - STS-053 - Crewmember in the aft flight deck.

STS053-40-013 - STS-053 - Crewmember at ease in the aft flight deck with cameras.

STS089-390-015 - STS-089 - RME 1312 - MS Dunbar checks on the Real-time Radiation Monitor Device (RRMD)

Inside view of the Real-Time Data Acquisition Processing System (RDAPS) trailer

STS089-390-014 - STS-089 - RME 1312 - MS Dunbar checks on the Real-time Radiation Monitor Device (RRMD)

Side view of the Real-Time Data Acquisition Processing System (RDAPS) trailer

STS079-344-027 - STS-079 - RME 1312 - Real-Time Radiation Monitor experiment

STS079-344-018 - STS-079 - RME 1312 - Real-Time Radiation Monitor experiment

STS079-344-017 - STS-079 - RME 1312 - Real-Time Radiation Monitor experiment

STS079-301-005 - STS-079 - RME 1319 RRMD - Real-time Radiation Monitoring Device

STS079-344-021 - STS-079 - RME 1312 - Real-Time Radiation Monitor experiment

STS079-344-020 - STS-079 - RME 1312 - Real-Time Radiation Monitor experiment

STS079-344-016 - STS-079 - RME 1312 - Real-Time Radiation Monitor experiment

STS079-309-005 - STS-079 - RRMD (Real-Time Radiation Monitor) control panel

STS079-301-003 - STS-079 - RME 1319 RRMD - Real-time Radiation Monitoring Device

STS079-302-034 - STS-079 - RRMD - Real-Time Radiation Monitors

STS079-344-015 - STS-079 - RME 1312 - Real-Time Radiation Monitor experiment

STS079-301-008 - STS-079 - RRMD - Real-time Radiation Monitoring Device

STS079-301-004 - STS-079 - RME 1319 RRMD - Real-time Radiation Monitoring Device

S79E5401 - STS-079 - RME 1312 - Real-Time Radiation Monitor experiment

STS079-344-026 - STS-079 - RME 1312 - Real-Time Radiation Monitor experiment

STS079-344-022 - STS-079 - RME 1312 - Real-Time Radiation Monitor experiment

STS079-344-028 - STS-079 - RME 1312 - Real-Time Radiation Monitor experiment

STS079-344-014 - STS-079 - RME 1312 - Real-Time Radiation Monitor experiment

STS079-344-025 - STS-079 - RME 1312 - Real-Time Radiation Monitor experiment

STS079-344-023 - STS-079 - RME 1312 - Real-Time Radiation Monitor experiment

S79E5403 - STS-079 - RME 1312 - Real-Time Radiation Monitor experiment bracket

S79E5402 - STS-079 - RME 1312 - Real-Time Radiation Monitor experiment

STS079-344-019 - STS-079 - RME 1312 - Real-Time Radiation Monitor experiment

STS079-344-024 - STS-079 - RME 1312 - Real-Time Radiation Monitor experiment

STS079-302-035 - STS-079 - RRMD - Real-Time Radiation Monitors

SGT Russel McAllister (foreground) and SPC John Trevino, assigned to the 11th Brigade, 43rd Air Defense Artillery, Fort Bliss, Texas, set up a Antenna Mast Group, which enables the Patriot missile batteries to communicate, in preparation for a tactical Patriot missile launch. The live firing are a real time opportunity for units to demonstrate their skills during the world's largest joint service, multi-nation tactical air operations exercise

Patriot missile battery support equipment from the 11th Brigade, 43rd Air Defense Artillery, Fort Bliss, Texas is set up in preparation for a tactical missile launch. The live firing are a real time opportunity for units to demonstrate their skills during the world's largest joint service, multi-nation tactical air operations exercise

Soldiers assigned to the 11th Brigade, 43rd Air Defense Artillery, from Fort Bliss, Texas, hook up power cables to a mobile generator in preparation for a tactical Patriot missile launch at a site on McGregor Range near El Paso, Texas. The live firings were a real time opportunity for units involved in ROVING SANDS '97 to demonstrate their skills. ROVING SANDS is a multinational effort and is the largest military exercise on United States soil that allows training in a joint environment to hone command and control procedures and integrate new systems in Theater and Air Missile Defense

A Patriot missile is launched by soldiers of the 11th Brigade, 43rd Air Defense Artillery, Fort Bliss, Texas, at a site on McGregor Range near El Paso, TX. The live firings were a real time opportunity for units involved in ROVING SANDS '97 to demonstrate their skills. ROVING SANDS is a multinational effort and is the largest military exercise on United States soil that allows training in a joint environment to hone command and control procedures and integrate new systems in Theater and Air Missile Defense

A soldier assigned to the 11th Brigade, 43rd Air Defense Artillery, from Fort Bliss, Texas, hurriedly runs an fiber optic cable from a Patriot missile launcher to its support communications trailer in preparation for a tactical Patriot missile launch at a site on McGregor Range near El Paso, Texas. The live firings were a real time opportunity for units involved in ROVING SANDS '97 to demonstrate their skills. ROVING SANDS is a multinational effort and is the largest military exercise on United States soil that allows training in a joint environment to hone command and control procedures and integrate new systems in Theater and Air Missile Defense

US Army, SPECIALIST (SPC) John Trevino, 3rd Battalion, 43rd Artillery, 11th Air Defense Artillery Brigade, Fort Bliss, Texas, levels an MIM-104 Patriot, AN/MPQ phased array radar unit in preparation for a missile launch at a site on McGregor Range, Fort Bliss. The live firings were a real time opportunity for units involved in Exercise ROVING SANDS '97 to demonstrate their skills, 30 April 1997

Soldiers assigned to the 11th Brigade, 43rd Air Defense Artillery, Fort Bliss, Texas, level a radar unit in preparation for a tactical Patriot missile launch. The live firing are a real time opportunity for units to demonstrate their skills during the world's largest joint service, multi-nation tactical air operations exercise

A Patriot missile is launched by soldiers of the 11th Brigade, 43rd Air Defense Artillery, Fort Bliss, Texas. The live firing are a real time opportunity for units to demonstrate their skills during the world's largest joint service, multi-nation tactical air operations exercise

Soldiers assigned to the 11th Brigade, 43rd Air Defense Artillery, Fort Bliss, Texas, set up a Antenna Mast Group, which enables the Patriot missile batteries to communicate, in preparation for a tactical Patriot missile launch. The live firing are a real time opportunity for units to demonstrate their skills during the world's largest joint service, multi-nation tactical air operations exercise

Soldiers assigned to the 11th Brigade, 43rd Air Defense Artillery, Fort Bliss, Texas set up a Antenna Mast Group, which enables the Patriot missile batteries to communicate, in preparation for the tactical Patriot missile launch. The live firing are a real time opportunity for units to demonstrate their skills during the world's largest joint service, multi-nation tactical air operations exercise

A mobile Patriot missile launcher belonging to the 11th Brigade, 43rd Air Defense Artillery, Fort Bliss, Texas is erected on a hardened launch point in preparation for a tactical Patriot missile launch. The live firing are a real time opportunity for units to demonstrate their skills during the world's largest joint service, multi-nation tactical air operations exercise

Mr. Richard Troxell, a civilian contractor, installs an Omni Tracs transmitter onto an Up-Armored High-Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle (HMMWV) at Pier 8 in the Port of Pusan, Republic of Korea, Oct. 20, 1998. Troxell is contracted through the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center (SPAWAR) from Charleston, N.C. The Omni Tracs satellite system is a commerical system that is being used as a prototype to determine its capabilities to keep track of their position and report that position to the Global Command and Control System in near real time. The transmitters are being installed on vehicles used in exercise Foal Eagle '98

Mr. Kevin Eitland, a civilian contractor, performs a systems check on the Omni Tracs transmitter using a 12 volt battery before installing it onto a military vehicle at Pier 8 in the Port of Pusan, Republic of Korea, Oct. 20, 1998. Eitland is contracted through the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center (SPAWAR) from Charleston, N.C. The Omni Tracs transmitter system is a prototype that is being field tested to determine its capabilities to keep track of the vehicle position and report that position to the Global Command and Control System in near real time. The transmitters are being installed on vehicles used in exercise Foal Eagle '98

Mr. Richard Troxell, a civilian contractor, installs an Omni Tracs transmitter onto an Up-Armored High-Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle (HMMWV) at Pier 8 in the Port of Pusan, Republic of Korea, Oct. 20, 1998. Troxell is contracted through the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center (SPAWAR) from Charleston, N.C. The Omni Tracs satellite system is a commerical system that is being used as a prototype to determine its capabilities to keep track of their position and report that position to the Global Command and Control System in near real time. The transmitters are being installed on vehicles used in exercise Foal Eagle '98

Mr. Ken Seal, a civilian contractor, assembles a SABER transmitter system which will be installed in a military vehicle at Pier 8 in the Port of Pusan, Republic of Korea, Oct. 20,1998. Seal is contracted through the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center (SPAWAR) from Charleston, N.C. The SABER transmitter system is a prototype that is being field tested to determine its capabilities to keep track of the vehicle position and report that position to the Global Command and Control System in near real time. The transmitters are being installed on vehicles used in exercise Foal Eagle '98

Mr. Richard Troxell, a civilian contractor installs an Omni Tracs transmitter onto an Up-Armored High-Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle (HMMWV) at Pier 8 in the Port of Pusan, Republic of Korea, Oct. 20, 1998. Troxell is contracted through the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center (SPAWAR) from Charleston, N.C. The Omni Tracs satellite system is a commerical system that is being used as a prototype to determine its capabilities to keep track of their position and report that position to the Global Command and Control System in near real time. The transmitters are being installed on vehicles used in exercise Foal Eagle '98

USS KITTY HAWK (CV 63) Fire Controlman 3rd Class selects switches on the Naval Tactical Data System (NTDS). The NTDS provides real time automatic exchange of air, surface, and subsurface tracking and fire control information

At the graduation of the 2nd Battalion Iraqi Army graduates, US Army (USA) Lieutenant General (LGEN) Ricardo S. Sanchez, Commander, Joint Task Force-7 (CJTF-7), is given a real time english interpretation of the Arab speaker addressing the graduates during Operation IRAQI FREEDOM

US Air Force (USAF) AIRMAN First Class (A1C) Sean McLaughlin wearing the Explosive Ordnance Disposal Bomb suit (EOD-8), and USAF STAFF Sergeant (SSGT) Michael Becker, 509th Civil Engineering Squadron (CES), Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Flight take a moment to describe different possibilities for operating and setting up the Real Time X-Ray (RTR-4) equipment, during a training session at Whiteman Air Force Base (AFB), Missouri (MO). The EOD Flight's primary duty is to support Whiteman AFB, the B-2 Spirit bomber and weapon systems, local and surrounding area to include, Nebraska, Kansas, Iowa and Illinois for any explosive disposal eventuality. The EOD team members train weekly to...

US Marine Corps (USMC) Marine Serget (SGT) William Hartzfeld (left), with the Marine Corps Systems Commd (MCSC), observes USMC Marine Private First Class (PFC) Germond Patton, assigned to the 3rd Light Armored Reconnaissce Battalion (LARB), view the ground monitor of a Dragon Eye Unmned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) in flight during training at the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center (MCAGCC), Marine Air Ground Task Force Training Center (MAGTFTC), Twentynine Palms, California (CA). The Dragon Eye is a five-lbs., back-packable, modular unmned aerial vehicle guided by computers that provides real time video of the terrain below it. The equipment provides USMC small units surveillce...

A Dragon Eye Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) flies in orbit during training at the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center (MCAGCC), Marine Air Ground Task Force Training Center (MAGTFTC), Twentynine Palms, California (CA). The Dragon Eye is a five-lbs., back-packable, modular unmanned aerial vehicle guided by computers that provides real time video of the terrain below it. The equipment provides USMC small units surveillance and reconnaissance capabilities

US Marine Corps (USMC) Marine Private First Class (PFC) Germond Patton operates an antenna use to communicate with the Dragon Eye Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) during training at the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center (MCAGCC), Marine Air Ground Task Force Training Center (MAGTFTC), Twentynine Palms, California (CA). The Dragon Eye is a five-lbs., back-packable, modular unmanned aerial vehicle guided by computers that provides real time video of the terrain below it. The equipment provides USMC small units surveillance and reconnaissance capabilities

US Marine Corps (USMC) Marine Lance Corporal (LCPL) Robert Diaz (sitting), from the 3rd Light Armored Reconnaissance Battalion (LARB), checks the settings on a Dragon Eye Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) while USMC Private First Class (PFC) Germond Patton winds up the bungee cord use to launch the Dragon Eye during training at the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center (MCAGCC), Marine Air Ground Task Force Training Center (MAGTFTC), Twentynine Palms, California (CA). The Dragon Eye is a five-lbs., back-packable, modular unmanned aerial vehicle guided by computers that provides real time video of the terrain below it. The equipment provides USMC small units surveillance and reconnaissance...

US Marine Corps (USMC) Marine Lance Corporal David Eisenhart from the 3rd Light Armored Reconnaissance Battalion (LARB) assembles a Dragon Eye Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) during training at the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center (MCAGCC), Marine Air Ground Task Force Training Center (MAGTFTC), Twentynine Palms, California (CA). The Dragon Eye is a five-lbs., back-packable, modular unmanned aerial vehicle guided by computers that provides real time video of the terrain below it. The equipment provides USMC small units surveillance and reconnaissance capabilities

U.S. National Archives

The objects in this collection are from The U.S. National Archives. The U.S. National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) was established in 1934 by President Franklin Roosevelt. NARA keeps those Federal records that are judged to have continuing value—about 2 to 5 percent of those generated in any given year. There are approximately 10 billion pages of textual records; 12 million maps, charts, and architectural and engineering drawings; 25 million still photographs and graphics; 24 million aerial photographs; 300,000 reels of motion picture film; 400,000 video and sound recordings; and 133 terabytes of electronic data. All of these materials are preserved because they are important to the workings of Government, have long-term research worth, or provide information of value to citizens.

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