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Aerial view of buildings with recently replaced roofs

Aerial view of buildings with recently replaced roofs. In the center is the first control tower building

Aerial view of buildings with recently replaced roofs

Residents stand on the roofs of their homes in a flooded-out settlement. The U.S. and other nations are sending aid to Bangladesh in response to the severe flooding in that country

The roofs of buildings collapse under the weight of ash from the eruption of Mount Pinatubo, a volcano which came to life in June 1991 for the first time in over 600 years

Overview of Anderson AFB flight line, with damaged roofs and battered hangers

Medium close-up of the rear entrance to a Russian An-124 Condor as Russian aircrew members from the Aviation Industrial Complex, Ulyanovsk, Russia, unload some prefabricated roofs for shelters. Some US Air Force Mobile Aerial Port Squadron (MAPS) personal look on. This mission is in direct support of Operation Restore Hope

An aerial view best shows the devastation left by Hurricane Marilyn. Homes without roofs, like broken doll houses, and belongings strewn across the island make the island look like some junk yard. Residents agree that it will take months before the islands return to the way they were before Marilyn

An aerial view best shows the devastation left by Hurricane Marilyn. Homes without roofs, like broken doll houses, and belongings strewn across the island make the island look like some junk yard. Residents agree that it will take months before the islands return to the way they were before Marilyn

On the way to the Seoul Tower in Seoul, Republic of Korea, roofs of more traditional buildings are backed by spectacular highrise buildings in the fourth largest city in the world. The Seoul Tower is one of the most popular tourist attractions in the Republic of Korea

On the way to the Seoul Tower in Seoul, Republic of Korea, roofs of more traditional buildings are backed by spectacular highrise buildings in the fourth largest city in the world. The Seoul Tower is one of the most popular tourist attractions in the Republic of Korea

On the way to the Seoul Tower in Seoul, Republic of Korea, roofs of more traditional buildings are backed by spectacular highrise buildings in the fourth largest city in the world. The Seoul Tower is one of the most popular tourist attractions in the Republic of Korea

On the way to the Seoul Tower in Seoul, Republic of Korea, roofs of more traditional buildings are backed by spectacular highrise buildings in the fourth largest city in the world, Oct. 5,1998. The Seoul Tower is one of the most popular tourist attractions in the Republic of Korea

Military Photographer of the Year Winner 1999 TITLE: "Hung Out to Dry" CATEGORY: Portfolio PLACE: Third Place Portfolio CAPTION INFORMATION: November 6th 1999. Anna Rebilli hangs her laundry in the disheveled backyard to her home in Cape Town, South Africa. U.S. Sailors and Marines were in Rebilli's neighborhood to help repair roofs of houses that were damaged in the first ever reported tornado in South Africa. IMAGE FILE #DD-SP-01-00052

Iraqis sit on the roofs of their Farm houses along route Tampa during Operation IRAQI FREEDOM

Iraqi looters load sections of tin roofs they removed them from abandoned facilities onto their truck during Operation IRAQI FREEDOM

Sandbags cover the roofs of new sea huts built on Camp Husaybah, Iraq (IRQ) during Operation IRAQI FREEDOM

The Hurricane force winds of Hurricane Ivan removed the roofs of various buildings on Naval Air Station (NAS) Pensacola, Florida

[Hurricane Katrina] New Orleans, LA, August 31, 2005 - FEMA Urban Search and Rescue (US&R) task force members walk on top of roofs as they search houses for survivors and the deceased. New Orleans is flooded and is being evacuated as a result of Hurricane Katrina. Photo by Jocelyn Augustino/FEMA

[Hurricane Katrina] Biloxi, Miss., September 12, 2005 -- A construction crew from San Antonio, Texas installs tarps as part of the USACE Blue Roof program. Hurricane Katrina damaged countless roofs throughout Mississippi. FEMA/Mark Wolfe

[Hurricane Katrina] Biloxi, Miss., September 12, 2005 -- A construction crew from Mobile, Ala. installs tarps as part of the USACE Blue Roof program. Hurricane Katrina damaged countless roofs throughout Mississippi. FEMA/Mark Wolfe

[Hurricane Katrina] Biloxi, Miss., September 12, 2005 -- A construction crew from San Antonio, Texas installs tarps as part of the USACE Blue Roof program. Hurricane Katrina damaged countless roofs throughout Mississippi. FEMA/Mark Wolfe

[Hurricane Katrina] Biloxi, Miss., September 12, 2005 -- A construction crew from San Antonio, Texas installs tarps as part of the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Blue Roof program. Hurricane Katrina damaged countless roofs throughout Mississippi. FEMA/Mark Wolfe

[Hurricane Katrina] Biloxi, Miss., September 13, 2005 -- Contractors gather blue tarps and other blue roof supplies in Biloxi, Miss. Blue tarps are being install on damaged roofs as a temporary fix. FEMA/Mark Wolfe

[Hurricane Katrina] Biloxi, Miss., September 13, 2005 -- Contractors gather blue tarps and other blue roof supplies in Biloxi, Miss. Blue tarps are being install on damaged roofs as a temporary fix. FEMA/Mark Wolfe

[Hurricane Katrina] Biloxi, Miss., September 13, 2005 -- Contractors gather furring strips and other blue roof supplies in Biloxi, Miss. Blue tarps are being install on damaged roofs as a temporary fix. FEMA/Mark Wolfe

[Hurricane Katrina] Gulfport, MS., 9/19/2005-- Aerial view of homes with FEMA blue tarps on the roofs in the Biloxi/Gulfport area following Hurricane Katrina. Andrea Booher/FEMA

[Hurricane Katrina] Gulfport, MS., 9/19/2005 -- Aerial view of damaged homes and properties with FEMA blue tarps on the roofs in the Biloxi/Gulfport area following Hurricane Katrina. Andrea Booher/FEMA

[Hurricane Katrina] Hattiesburg, Miss., October 13, 2005 -- Kari Baker, Quality Assurance Inspector with Reclamation, inspects approximately 25 houses per day under the Corps of Engineers Blue Roof Program, and is seen here preparing project materials. Hurricane Katrina damaged hundreds of roofs in the Hattiesburg area. George Armstrong/FEMA

[Hurricane Katrina] Hattiesburg, Miss., October 13, 2005 -- Thanks to Hurricane Katrina, FEMA "Blue Roofs" are a familiar site in Hattiesburg. Hundreds of buildings in this area were damaged. George Armstrong/FEMA

[Hurricane Katrina] Hattiesburg, Miss., October 13, 2005 -- At a local home improvement store Bob Campbell, Michael Strombach, and Michelle Thompson provide information about the US Corps of Engineers "Blue Roof" program which covers damaged roofs with blue tarps. Huuricane Katrina damaged hundreds of homes in Hattiesburg. George Armstrong/FEMA

[Hurricane Katrina] Ocean Springs, Miss., October 30, 2005 -- Blue roofs are visible all over coastal Mississippi. High winds from Hurricane Katrina damaged roofs throughout Mississippi. FEMA/Mark Wolfe

[Severe Storms and Tornadoes] Madisonville, Ky, December 12, 2005 - Construction crews work on the damaged roofs of adjacent houses that were hit by one of the tornadoes spawned by a storm system that swept through Hopkins and Marshall counties on the afternoon of November 15. Individuals and business owners in these two western Kentucky counties are eligible for federal disaster assistance under a declaration issued by President Bush on December first. Win Henderson/FEMA photo

[Hurricane Rita] Lake Charles, LA January 18, 2006 - Aerial photograph of blue roofs in southwest Louisiana. Photo by Greg Henshall / FEMA

[Hurricane Rita] Lake Charles, LA, February 22, 2006 - FEMA's blue roof program provides tarps to temporarily protect dwellings from further rain damage. FEMA encourages hurricane victims to repair their roofs quickly but contractors aren't always available. Robert Kaufmann/FEMA

[Hurricane Katrina] New Orleans, LA, February 27, 2006 - FEMA provided blue plastic sheeting to temporarily protect roofs damaged by hurricane winds until the homeowner can repair or replace the damaged roof. Some structures, still in need of repair, continue to rely on the blue roof. Robert Kaufmann/FEMA

[Hurricane Katrina] New Orleans, LA, February 27, 2006 - The blue roofscapes are slowly disappearing in New Orleans as more residents begin repairs on their homes. FEMA's blue roof program installed blue plastic sheeting on almost 79,000 hurricane damaged roofs in Louisiana. Robert Kaufmann/FEMA

[Hurricane Katrina] Gulfport, Miss., August 15, 2006 -- Contractors are now replacing the temporary blue roofs with permanent roofs. Hurricane Katrina destroyed countless roofs along the Mississippi Gulf Coast. Mark Wolfe/FEMA

[Hurricane Katrina] Hurricane clips, shown circled above, help anchor roofs to the main structure to prevent detachment due to sever wind. These clips can be found at many hardware stores, and are an inexpensive way to mitigate homes against sever losses from hurricanes. The home above kept its lid on during the severe winds brought by Hurricane Katrina, even though construction of the house had not been completed. Photo by William Dryden/FEMA.

[Severe Storms and Tornadoes] Americus, GA, March 8, 2007 -- FEMA blue tarps cover roofs damaged by the Georgia tornadoes. The blue roofs are only a temporary measure to keep interiors dry until the roof can be repaired. Mark Wolfe/FEMA

[Severe Storms, Tornadoes, Straight-line Winds, and Flooding] Jackson, TN, February 7, 2008 -- Blown in walls and missing roofs, Tornado damaged buildings at Union University, a Christian college that sustained major damage. Jocelyn Augustino/FEMA

[Severe Storms and Tornadoes] Seneca, Missouri, May 11, 2008 -- Vehicles were flipped and crushed and roofs were torn off house and other structures by a powerful tornado that tore through the area May 10. Michael Raphael/FEMA

[Hurricane Gustav] Baton Rouge, LA, September 7, 2008 -- A neighborhood damaged from Hurricane Gustav; blue tarps roofs and piles up tree limbs and debris for removal. Jacinta Quesada/FEMA

[Hurricane Ike] Galveston, TX, September 17, 2008 -- This waterfront community appears to have survived against Hurricane Ike as many of the homes and the roofs appear to be intact. FEMA/ Jocelyn Augustino

Hurricane/Tropical Storm - La Porte, Texas, September 26, 2008 -- Contractors working for the Corps of Engineers and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) installing temporary plastic "Blue Roofs" on housing damaged by Hurricane Ike. The repairs prevent further loss to homeowners until permanent repairs can be made. Leif Skoogfors/FEMA

Tornado - Berkeley, Mo. , May 11, 2011 -- Blue roofs and clean driveways show the recovery is progressing for some in St Louis County, MO. FEMA encourages all to register at the disasterRecovery center in Ferguson. Jace Anderson/FEMA

Hopatcong, N.J., Nov. 23, 2012 -- High winds caused by Hurricane Sandy on Oct. 29, 2012, blew down many trees in Sussex County. Hopatcong was hit especially hard with many trees falling on the roofs of homes causing major structural damage. FEMA is working with state and local officials to assist residents who were affected by Hurricane Sandy. Walt Jennings/FEMA

Byram, N.J., Nov. 23, 2012 -- High winds caused by Hurricane Sandy on Oct. 29, 2012, blew down many trees in Sussex County. Byram was hit especially hard with many trees falling on the roofs of homes causing major structural damage. FEMA is working with state and local officials to assist residents who were affected by Hurricane Sandy. Walt Jennings/FEMA

Oceanside, N.Y., Nov. 12, 2012 -- When Hurricane Sandy made landfall on Oct. 29, 2012, it brought winds exceeding 60 mph that toppled trees, and ripped shingles off of roofs resulting in tarps being placed on roofs to keep rain water out before the roofs can be replaced. Walt Jennings/FEMA

Tornado - West Liberty, Ky. , March 12, 2012 -- The blue tarps seen throughout the town cover roofs damaged by the March 2nd tornado in West Liberty, Ky. Federal and State agencies are providing resources for the recovery effort. Photo by Tim Burkitt/FEMA

Petal, Miss., Feb. 24, 2013 -- Damage such as missing or severely damaged roofs are seen throughout the town of Petal. Volunteers have been working in this area, gutting houses that can be restored. FEMA's Voluntary Agency's Liaison works to match up volunteer mission workers with homeowners in need of help clearing the debris. Photo by Marilee Caliendo/FEMA

Hattiesburg, Miss., Feb. 16, 2013 -- Homes without roofs or flattened by fallen trees are seen throughout Hattiesburg. FEMA representatives are going door to door in those neighborhoods in the tornado's path, answering questions and providing information on how to apply for FEMA assistance. Photo by Marilee Caliendo/FEMA

Hattiesburg, Miss., Feb. 16, 2013 -- Homes without roofs for protection are totally destroyed by the tornado's fury. FEMA is locating Disaster Recovery Centers in the areas that were hardest hit and FEMA staff is in these neighborhoods providing information on how to apply for FEMA help. Photo by Marilee Caliendo/FEMA

U.S. National Archives

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