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Map Showing Selection by the Choctaw Coal and Railway Company, of a Strip of Land Two Hundred Feet Wide with a Length of Three Thousand In Addition to Right of Way for a Station, From Station 0+87.5 to Station 30+87.5

Loud 19, Three young girls

Loud 17, Three young girls, St. Paul Island. Photograph by Gray & Hereford

Kentucky River Lock and Dam Number Three

Kentucky River Lock and Dam Number Three

Kentucky River Lock and Dam Number Three

Map Showing Selection by the Choctaw, Coal, and Railway Company of a Strip of Land of Two Hundred in Width with a Length of Three Thousand Feet in Addition to Right of Way for Station[2 copies]

Photograph of Three Men Standing in Front of a Log Cabin Surrounded by a Fence

Page Three Parole Transcript

Kentucky River Lock and Dam Number Three

Kentucky River Lock and Dam Number Three

Kentucky River Lock and Dam Number Three

Man with Three Horses and a Calf; Outbuildings

Chickens with House and Three Children

Three Small Frame Houses - One under Construction

Man Pushing Hand Garden Cultivator, Three Men Watching

Three Men Inspecting Cornfield

Man with Three Children Standing in Cornfield

Small Log House, Man and Three Children

Three Men (includes Moses Blue Hare and Adam Frost Dog) Holding Dressed Turkeys Ready for Market

Three Men Showing Four Horses

Percy Cock's Horses, Three Mares and One Gelding; All Three Mares Bred

Clarence Kindle's Horses (Three Horses in Pasture)

Four Horses, Three in Harness

Kentucky River Lock and Dam Number Three

Kentucky River Lock and Dam Number Three

Kentucky River Lock and Dam Number Three

Kentucky River Lock and Dam Number Three

Kentucky River Lock and Dam Number Three

Kentucky River Lock and Dam Number Three

Kentucky River Lock and Dam Number Three

Kentucky River Lock and Dam Number Three

Kentucky River Lock and Dam Number Three

Kentucky River Lock Three, Upper River Crib

Three Tables on Dimensions and Friction Loss

US Army soldiers from the Presidio pose for a group shot, with their Springfield 03 rifles, in front of the ruins of the Hall of Justice. The troops aided the local police force in keeping order and protection for the citizens of the devastated city. On April 18, 1906 at 5:15 AM a quake of 8.25 on the Richter scale hit San Francisco. Greater destruction came from the fires afterwards. The city burned for three days. The combination destroyed 490 city blocks and 25,000 buildings, leaving 250,000 homeless and killing between 450 and 700. Estimated damages, over $350 million

Refugee camp overlooks the damaged city of San Francisco. This camp might be on Mission Dolores Park. Note the Ladies and Mens facilities. In the distance are domes of the City Hall (left) and the Call Building (right). On April 18, 1906 at 5:15 AM a quake of 8.25 on the Richter scale hit San Francisco. Greater destruction came from the fires afterwards. The city burned for three days. The combination destroyed 490 city blocks and 25,000 buildings, leaving 250,000 homeless and killing between 450 and 700. Estimated damages, over $350 million

Panoramic View of San Francisco on April 1909 three years after the massive 8.25 earthquake of 1906. The view from 1000 feet above Jones and Washington Street, looking eastward. Goat Island (now Yerba Buena Island) in the San Francisco Bay, is in the upper far left. Mason Street cuts across right corner. On April 18, 1906 at 5:15 AM a quake of 8.25 on the Richter scale hit San Francisco. Greater destruction came from the fires afterwards. The city burned for three days. The combination destroyed 490 city blocks and 25,000 buildings, leaving 250,000 homeless and killing between 450 and 700. Estimated damages, over $350 million

Panoramic View of San Francisco in Flames Other Effects of the Disaster "This panoramic view shows San Francisco in flames, five hours after the earthquake. The photograph taken from Mason Street at 10:00 A.M., April 18, 1906. There is little evidence of earthquake damage. Most of the city's downtown buildings appear to be intact, yet flames later partially or wholly destroyed these buildings. The fire continued unchecked for three days

Looking down Fourth Street just off Market Street, soldiers patrol the devastated area. An unidentified building is still standing. On April 18, 1906 at 5:15 AM a quake of 8.25 on the Richter scale hit San Francisco. Greater destruction came from the fires afterwards. The city burned for three days. The combination destroyed 490 city blocks and 25,000 buildings, leaving 250,000 homeless and killing between 450 and 700. Estimated damages, over $350 million

Mission Relief Headquarters. The barn of James Rolph Jr. on Guerrero Street was converted into the headquarters for Mission relief. Later, Rolph became Mayor of San Francisco and then governor. On April 18, 1906 at 5:15 AM a quake of 8.25 on the Richter scale hit San Francisco. Greater destruction came from the fires afterwards. The city burned for three days. The combination destroyed 490 city blocks and 25,000 buildings, leaving 250,000 homeless and killing between 450 and 700. Estimated damages, over $350 million

The city of San Francisco on fire after the earthquake. On April 18, 1906 at 5:15 AM a quake of 8.25 on the Richter scale hit San Francisco. Greater destruction came from the fires afterwards. The city burned for three days. The combination destroyed 490 city blocks and 25,000 buildings, leaving 250,000 homeless and killing between 450 and 700. Estimated damages, over $350 million

A group of laborers appear to be cleaning building blocks for later use in the rebuilding of San Francisco. A soldier with a Springfield Rifle 03 is picking up something. On April 18, 1906 at 5:15 AM a quake of 8.25 on the Richter scale hit San Francisco. Greater destruction came from the fires afterwards. The city burned for three days. The combination destroyed 490 city blocks and 25,000 buildings, leaving 250,000 homeless and killing between 450 and 700. Estimated damages, over $350 million

Fresh water is delivered via mule drawn barrel wagon to the refugees at a camp in the Presidio. Military personnel stand by as women and children bring buckets to fill. On April 18, 1906 at 5:15 AM a quake of 8.25 on the Richter scale hit San Francisco. Greater destruction came from the fires afterwards. The city burned for three days. The combination destroyed 490 city blocks and 25,000 buildings, leaving 250,000 homeless and killing between 450 and 700. Estimated damages, over $350 million

Men ride horseback on an unidentified street showing some of the earthquake damage in the background. On April 18, 1906 at 5:15 AM a quake of 8.25 on the Richter scale hit San Francisco. Greater destruction came from the fires afterwards. The city burned for three days. The combination destroyed 490 city blocks and 25,000 buildings, leaving 250,000 homeless and killing between 450 and 700. Estimated damages, over $350 million

One of the many Street Kitchens that sprang up in the aftermath of the quake. This one is in front of the Baker & Greenwich Street Market, near the Presidio. On April 18, 1906 at 5:15 AM a quake of 8.25 on the Richter scale hit San Francisco. Greater destruction came from the fires afterwards. The city burned for three days. The combination destroyed 490 city blocks and 25,000 buildings, leaving 250,000 homeless and killing between 450 and 700. Estimated damages, over $350 million

Breadlines form up at Mission High School in the aftermath of the quake. On April 18, 1906 at 5:15 AM a quake of 8.25 on the Richter scale hit San Francisco. Greater destruction came from the fires afterwards. The city burned for three days. The combination destroyed 490 city blocks and 25,000 buildings, leaving 250,000 homeless and killing between 450 and 700. Estimated damages, over $350 million

Looking, toward the Call Building, northeast up Market Street. The Call Building is enveloped in smoke on the right side of the street. The fire engine is attempting to find water in a hydrant. Curved building on the left is the James Flood Building at Market and Powell, the Emporium is across the street. On April 18, 1906 at 5:15 AM a quake of 8.25 on the Richter scale hit San Francisco. Greater destruction came from the fires afterwards. The city burned for three days. The combination destroyed 490 city blocks and 25,000 buildings, leaving 250,000 homeless and killing between 450 and 700. Estimated damages, over $350 million

Soldiers from the Presidio stand amid the rubble of fallen buildings after the earthquake. The Hall of Records (dome) is in the background (right). On April 18, 1906 at 5:15 AM a quake of 8.25 on the Richter scale hit San Francisco. Greater destruction came from the fires afterwards. The city burned for three days. The combination destroyed 490 city blocks and 25,000 buildings, leaving 250,000 homeless and killing between 450 and 700. Estimated damages, over $350 million

As soldiers from the Presidio patrol with their Springfield 03 at ready, civilians queue up in bread lines for food in the aftermath of the quake. On April 18, 1906 at 5:15 AM a quake of 8.25 on the Richter scale hit San Francisco. Greater destruction came from the fires afterwards. The city burned for three days. The combination destroyed 490 city blocks and 25,000 buildings, leaving 250,000 homeless and killing between 450 and 700. Estimated damages, over $350 million

Bread line forms at the Signal Corps at the Presidio. On April 18, 1906 at 5:15 AM a quake of 8.25 on the Richter scale hit San Francisco. Greater destruction came from the fires afterwards. The city burned for three days. The combination destroyed 490 city blocks and 25,000 buildings, leaving 250,000 homeless and killing between 450 and 700. Estimated damages, over $350 million

A view along Market Street at the remains of the Call Building (domed) (right), the Mutual Bank Building (left), and the Chronicle Building (rear). On April 18, 1906 at 5:15 AM a quake of 8.25 on the Richter scale hit San Francisco. Greater destruction came from the fires afterwards. The city burned for three days. The combination destroyed 490 city blocks and 25,000 buildings, leaving 250,000 homeless and killing between 450 and 700. Estimated damages, over $350 million

A view of busy Market Street looking southward. This shot may be taken just before the earthquake hit. There is no date on the photo. On April 18, 1906 at 5:15 AM a quake of 8.25 on the Richter scale hit San Francisco. Greater destruction came from the fires afterwards. The city burned for three days. The combination destroyed 490 city blocks and 25,000 buildings, leaving 250,000 homeless and killing between 450 and 700. Estimated damages, over $350 million

Ruin of the $7,000,000 City Hall by earthquake and fire. The building was a monument of poor workmanship, materials and design. The U.S. Geological Survey Report on the San Francisco Earthquake of April 18,1906. (Possible photograph by Frank Soule) On April 18, 1906 at 5:15 AM a quake of 8.25 on the Richter scale hit San Francisco. Greater destruction came from the fires afterwards. The city burned for three days. The combination destroyed 490 city blocks and 25,000 buildings, leaving 250,000 homeless and killing between 450 and 700. Estimated damages, over $350 million

A small group of San Franciscans now stands in rubble where 308 Van Ness Avenue once stood. In the background is whats left of City Hall. On April 18, 1906 at 5:15 AM a quake of 8.25 on the Richter scale hit San Francisco. Greater destruction came from the fires afterwards. The city burned for three days. The combination destroyed 490 city blocks and 25,000 buildings, leaving 250,000 homeless and killing between 450 and 700. Estimated damages, over $350 million

Burnt-out truck of an inbound streetcar lies on Third Street between Market and Mission. The Call Building (left) at the corner of Third and Market streets. Mutual Savings Bank is across Market and Kearny. On April 18, 1906 at 5:15 AM a quake of 8.25 on the Richter scale hit San Francisco. Greater destruction came from the fires afterwards. The city burned for three days. The combination destroyed 490 city blocks and 25,000 buildings, leaving 250,000 homeless and killing between 450 and 700. Estimated damages, over $350 million

As fires rage in the background, the newly of San Francisco gather at Union Square. The tall steel skeleton, then known as the Union League Building, was under construction at the time of the earthquake, later finished, and still standing on Geary Street. The Butler Building at right, also under construction at the time. Its walls peeled away during the earthquake and killed several people in buildings adjoining the structure. On April 18, 1906 at 5:15 AM a quake of 8.25 on the Richter scale hit San Francisco. Greater destruction came from the fires afterwards. The city burned for three days. The combination destroyed 490 city blocks and 25,000 buildings, leaving 250,000...

An unidentified area of San Francisco suffers total devastation. Unknown woman poses for a picture. On April 18, 1906 at 5:15 AM a quake of 8.25 on the Richter scale hit San Francisco. Greater destruction came from the fires afterwards. The city burned for three days. The combination destroyed 490 city blocks and 25,000 buildings, leaving 250,000 homeless and killing between 450 and 700. Estimated damages, over $350 million

The burning of San Francisco. Reproduced from the only photograph that shows the entire scope and extent of this awful conflagration the worst in the history of the world. Fire line over three miles long, property loss three hundred million dollars. On April 18, 1906 at 5:15 AM a quake of 8.25 on the Richter scale hit San Francisco. Greater destruction came from the fires afterwards. The city burned for three days. The combination destroyed 490 city blocks and 25,000 buildings, leaving 250,000 homeless and killing between 450 and 700. Estimated damages, over $350 million

Like nomads settling in for a stay this is the largest tent refugee camp on the Presidio Reservation. United States Army General Hospital is in the background. On April 18, 1906 at 5:15 AM a quake of 8.25 on the Richter scale hit San Francisco. Greater destruction came from the fires afterwards. The city burned for three days. The combination destroyed 490 city blocks and 25,000 buildings, leaving 250,000 homeless and killing between 450 and 700. Estimated damages, over $350 million

A crowd gathers at Telegraph Hill to watch the burning of San Francisco. The view is looking south. On April 18, 1906 at 5:15 AM a quake of 8.25 on the Richter scale hit San Francisco. Greater destruction came from the fires afterwards. The city burned for three days. The combination destroyed 490 city blocks and 25,000 buildings, leaving 250,000 homeless and killing between 450 and 700. Estimated damages, over $350 million

Soldiers from the Presidio patrol this area, looking north from the junction of Sansome and Bush Streets. The area is known as the insurance district of San Francisco. On April 18, 1906 at 5:15 AM a quake of 8.25 on the Richter scale hit San Francisco. Greater destruction came from the fires afterwards. The city burned for three days. The combination destroyed 490 city blocks and 25,000 buildings, leaving 250,000 homeless and killing between 450 and 700. Estimated damages, over $350 million

Floating Crane Hercules and Three Destroyers in Dry Dock Number 4 Looking South

Floating Crane Hercules and Three Destroyers in Dry Dock Number 4 Looking Northeast

Floating Crane Hercules and Three Destroyers in Dry Dock Number 4 Looking North

Wash Borings, Hole Number 2A, Opposite Side of Casing Shown in F540N4, 2 Inch Casing from El. 76, Below Bench Mark, Damaged at 9.15 A.M., August 15, 1916, Using Three One/Half Pound Sticks of Dynamite

Wash Borings, Hole Number 2A, Opposite Side of Casing Shown in F540N3, 2 Inch Casing from El. 76, Below Bench Mark, Damaged at 9.15 A.M., August 15, 1916, Using Three One/Half Pound Sticks of Dynamite

Ceremonies and Parades - Remarkable religious service on troop ship. A Roman Catholic service on a troop ship in the danger zone. The men are wearing lifebelts and the service is being conducted by Brother Scanlan, a Franciscan Monk, who was three times tken out to be shot in Mesopotamia and on each occasion reprieved

Airplanes - Types - Loening Monoplane with 300 H.P. Hispano Motor. Front view of machine in which Maj. Schroeder established new world's record by carrying three passengers to an altitude of 21,000 feet. Taken at McCook Field, Dayton, Ohio. Note the design of wing structure; also manner in which wings fasten to upper body longitudinals and are braced to bottom of body. Latter feature cuts weight of machine in half. Designed by Grover C. Loening, of the Loening Aeronautical Engineering Corporation, New York City. From S.C. Loening

Airplanes - Accidents - Three quarters rear view of wrecked Caproni, Camp Resaniti, Pilot

Ceremonies - Ohio - Celebrating Armistice news in Cincinnati. Letting the world know he sent three into service

Ceremonies - Liberation of Alsace (Strassbourg) - In Colmar, Alsace, President Poincare received a big reception from the grateful peasants. Three children of Colmar, a girl with the republican cap of France, a boy in the traditional dress of Uncle Sam, and an Alsatian girl deliver an address of welcome to the president

American Red Cross - E thru H - Captain Carter H. Harrison of the American Red Cross in Toul, France. He has three times held office as Mayor of Chicago

Balloons - Helium Plants - Development of helium work carried on under direction of the Bureau of Mines. Expander engines, Plant No. 3, located three miles north of Petrolia, Texas

Ceremonies and Parades - Ceremonies as clock is pushed ahead one hour. Marcus M. Marks, Chairman of National Daylight Saving Movement, pushing the hands around from two to three on the master clock that controls the big dials on the Metropolitan Tower, New York City, as the Daylight Saving Law went into effect

Airplanes - Flight - The scout plane has become a favorite at U.S. Marine Aviation Field, Miami, Fla. Shows three of them going on a flight. From C.P.I

American Red Cross - Refreshments - Bellefontaine, Ohio, War Activities. Canteen workers serving soldiers at station. 64 ladies, divided into three weekly shifts, attend all trains from early morning until 10 p.m

Ceremonies and Parades - Beloit, Wis., War Activities. Loyalty Day parade. Shows three large flags carried in parade

Ceremonies and Parades - Three battalions of the U.S. National Army parade before Buckingham Palace, London. May 11, 1918

Ceremonies - Employees of Ford Shipbuilding Plant on road home after a happy three hours

Balloons - Hangars and Beds - Atlantic Airship, largest in world, makes debut in England. The Atlantic airship, or R-33, makes its debut recently at Shelby, England. Flight proved successful for she remained three hours in air reaching an altitude of 2,000 feet

Airplanes - Instruments - Manufacture of oil tank gauges for airplanes at the Akron Selle Co. Plant, Akron, O. Tanner U.S. #30 gauge, three rod consturction for deep tanks. Rec'd from Akron Selle Co

American Red Cross - Headquarters & Buildings - Stained glass window in Red Cross Headquarters. The three stained glass windows in the new $800,000 American Red Cross Building dedicated on Saturday, May 12th, in Washington

Saloniki front. Three Turkish officers. March 1917

Balloons - Helium Plants - Development of helium work carried on under direction of the Bureau of Mines. Interchangers. Plant No. 3, located three miles north of Petrolia, Texas

Airplanes - Instruments - "Tanner" U.S. No. 40, Gasoline Indicating Gauge, three rod construction with the old style head; manufactured by Akron Selle Co., Akron, Ohio. From Akron Selle Co

American Red Cross - In the Zone of Advance - Activities - A.R.C., outpose three miles behind the St. Mihiel Salient. It was formerly a German moving picture hall as the sign over the door indicates

American Red Cross - Headquarters & Buildings - American Red Cross General Offices at Berne, Switzerland. The Red Cross occupies three floors of this building and the ground floor of the building next door to the right. The Red Cross also has office as the Warehouses in Kehrsatz, Bumplix and Lauzanne, Switzerland

Airplanes - Instruments - Aeroplane Instruments. Tanner U.S. #40 Gauge improved head construction, three rods suitable for very deep tanks. The Akron Selle Co., Akron, Ohio

Artists - Famous cartoonists work for Third Liberty Loan. Photo shows three prominent newspaper cartoonists who "did their bit" for the third Liberty Loan. They are here seen in front of the Liberty Theatre erected in front of the Public Library, New York, by the Stage Women's War Relief Committee. April 1918. They are left to right: Hy Myers, Clare Briggs and "Rube" Goldbery

Airplanes - Engines - Motor manufacture. Lincoln Motor Co., Plant. Detroit, Michigan. Three of the four Ingersoll Milling machine used for milling the joint and cylinder faces of crank cases

Balloons - In the Theatre of Operations - Dirigibles. Stabling a Dirigible on a windy day is no easy task. When the French had the station one was destroyed by being blown against the steel framework of the great canvas hangar. The hangar is seven hundred feet long and ninety feet high. It will accomodate two large ships or three small ones. A second hangar is in couse of construction. When complete, this unit of the American Naval Aviation Service will fly four dirigibles and keep up constant patrols

American Red Cross - Canteens - Celebrating victory in London. American wounded at Red Cross headquarters give three cheers for Red Cross. They have just had a meal at Red Cross Canteen

Airplanes - Historical - Swedish aviator and seaplane for Atlantic flight. Seaplane in which Capt. Hugo Sundstedt will make flight. Three quarters side view

American Red Cross - In the Service of Interior - Christmas Boxes - Red Cross worker furnishes box for Christmas packages. Mother of soldier receiving container for Christmas package furnished by the American Red Cross in Cincinnati, Ohio. She is holding in her hand the printed label, mailed home by her son, which has to be attached to the package. Packages must not weigh over three pounds

Balloons - Helium Plants - Development of helium work carried on under direction of the Bureau of Mines. Steel cylinder Rack, Helium Pump, Vaccuum Pump, Plant No. 3, located three miles north of Petrolia, Texas

American Red Cross - Miscellaneous - Service Pin that will be presented to Rev. Windsor by the Red Cross Chapter of Rayville, LA. You will notice on the pin, from the bottom up, three stars on one bar means a set of triplets, the next two bars mean two sets of twins. Rev. Windsor has 19 sons and 1 daughter

Colleges and Universities - Utah Agricultural College - Three Companies A, B and C of the battalion of the Utah Agricultural College, lined up for inspection. Spring 1918

Balloons - Helium Plants - Development of helium work carried on under direction of the Bureau of Mines. Exterior of main Plant Building, located three miles north of Petrolia, Texas

Balloons - Hangars and Beds - Three 5000 cubit feet nurse balloons in hangar